Weekly News​

February 18, 2020 

Dear Friends,
 
For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.   (Matthew 6:21) 
 
I was tempted to call my ukulele teacher and tell her I wasn't coming to my lesson today because I hadn't had time to practice. But, when I think carefully about it, the reason I didn't practice wasn't because I didn't have enough time, it's that I didn't use the time I did have over the course of the past week to practice. 
 
Rather, I used some of the time I could have spent practicing ukulele baking cookies to send to my parents. I sorted through my closet to find things to donate to Samaritan's Closet. And, I started reading a new book someone lent to me last week. The truth is that it's not that I didn't have time to practice the ukulele, it's just that I didn't make practicing the ukulele a priority. 
 
When I've read this verse about where your treasure is in the past, I've thought of treasure as money. And, I think the passage can be responsibly interpreted that way. However, in the last few weeks, I've been thinking a lot about time as a treasure. In a world full of people and things competing for our time, time is a valued treasure over which we often think we have little control--in terms of we don't control how much of it we get to spend on this earth. That's true.
 
But, we do have some control over the twenty-four hours of time we get each day. Often we have more control over that than we might think. It seems that being "too busy" has become the norm and we've become slaves to the tyranny of the urgent. 
 
But it doesn't have to be this way. While we can't make more time, we are responsible for what we make of the time we have. That involves being intentional about planning how we use our time and setting and preserving boundaries. It means saying "no" sometimes even to things we want to do and "yes" to prioritizing our time and spending it on the people and things that are truly important to us.
     
Yours in Christ,
Pastor Robin
​​ ​​​​​​Thank you, Linda Miller, for providing the weekly reflection and prayer.​​
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February 18, 2020
Dear friends,                                                                                  

The snow that covers the land and trees and gardens and rocks after last night’s storm has provided a blank slate for the day. Who will be brave enough to lay down the first tracks in this pristine landscape? Already the snow plows have been out, clearing a way for those who must drive to work, play and appointments. And I am grateful for their diligence. But today, right now, I don’t want to travel on a cleared path. I want to be a bird. I want to leave no evidence of my travel. I want to fly over the expanses of clean whiteness and see the paths of the animals who have been up before sunrise, or who are heading home after a night of foraging.


















The wind has picked up. Branches are shrugging off their layers of snow, sending flakes to dance on the wind. I can’t see across the bay, so I know that more snow is coming and will cover up all those animal tracks. The blank slate will return; but isn’t that what each day really is? A chance to begin again, no matter our circumstances of health, wealth or happiness. If we were too busy yesterday to pray, today is new and that’s reason enough for prayer and praise. If what you said and did – or left undone – left a trail of disappointment, today is the day to make it right again. This is the day the Lord has made! Let us rejoice and be glad in it! Snow or not.

Dear God,
Thank you for the snow
    that makes the world look clean and new.
Thank you for the gift of your Son
    who makes US clean and new.
Amen.
     
​​*****
​Linda
 
Along the tree line behind the house there is a trail of footprints, sometimes clearly visible, sometimes disappearing under the boughs of a pine tree. Who made those tracks? Where do those footprints lead? And I know that if I were a bird I’d be able to see many more meandering trails, belonging to deer or coyote or fox, or even the subtle tunneling of mouse or vole. In the spring, after all the snow is gone, I will find clear evidence in the matted grass of all the activity that went on under that blanket of snow.
The video of this past Sunday's service is below.